Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Olivia's Big Day


Today Olivia showed me that she's mastered the Soundabet. We took a minute out of daycare time and she rattled off the uppercase King's cards. She's holding the prize for learning the King's cards: a deck of the Queen's cards to master using the same method: practice only those she knows until she demands another card be added to the practice deck.

Today was also her first day in after school piano lessons. Another step towards a household of full of readers and home musicians!

Yeah, Olivia!

4 comments:

sylvia said...

Hi Dan

Wonderful, those nice kids really resemble french kids they're all kids from the planet.....
In my daughter's lycée ( for kids over 15 ) you count more than 70 different nationalities all " living in perfect harmony "....

I work in a class every friday.... they are 3/4 years old...which project might we carry on " overoceans " together please ?

cheers, thanks,
sylvia

poncia5 said...

thank you so much Mr.Gurney for all your support with these kindergarten children!! Olivia was soo excited last night but would not tell me why. she had hid her queen's cards and told me, " keep checking the blog mom", when i realized her accomplishment she came running around the corner to show me her queen's cards! she was laughing and grinning from ear to ear. she could not have been more proud. a beautiful sight for a parent... thanks again.

Dan Gurney, Mr. Kindergarten said...

Hi Sylvia. Maybe we could do a blogging partnership between France and California? That would be fun. I'm not sure, though, that children that young have a very clear idea about how far away France is from these parts.

poncia5, thanks for sharing your story. Olivia told me she now knows all but 3 of the Queen's Deck! Incredible. It's just as much fun for me to see the excitement on their faces as they begin to see through the reading/writing process. Now the key is to encourage Olivia to write a lot.

In the earliest stages, refrain from correcting spelling, punctuation, etc. as much as you possibly can. That's for later. the idea is to get her to use her knowledge of letter sounds to ENCODE as well as decode. Writing will strengthen the neurological links in her brain.

James Gurney said...

I'm really intrigued to learn more about how "writing strengthens the neurological links to the brain." Is that more true for writing with a pencil than typing on a keyboard? I read somewhere that the ancient Romans learned to write with a stylus in beeswax. How does that tactile sense affect your deep knowledge of the letterforms?